I am one of those moderate Christians

Mar 07 2008 Published by under Politics, Rant, Science & Religion

Phil Plait calls out McCain for accepting the endorsement of a religious extremist, but, thankfully, unlike some atheist bloggers, he also reminds us that there are lots of moderate and reasonable religious people out there who may diagree with Phil about the details of religion, but are good folks for whom the extremists do not speak. He does, however, extort us moderate religious types to stand up and remind everybody that the extremists do not speak for us.

So I'm doing that.

The sad fact is that the religious right has had an increasing influence over politics in recent years. Mind you, I've been aware of them for a long time. I grew up in Berkeley, CA, where people (including people in my church) were all upset about the Religious Right long before they were really an appreciable political force. But, today, the extreme religious types have contributed to what is, from my perspective, the ruining of the Republican party.

I voted for John McCain in the 2000 primary. I will not vote for him this year. Not unless he repudiates both the creationist political forces that have become de rigeur constitents for any Republican candidate, and not unless he repudiates the Bush/Cheney administration as a horrible thing. He will do neither. (Actually, even if he did, I still wouldn't vote for him at this point, but I might think about him as a serious candidate.)

I am a Christian, but I don't want to shove that down anybody's throat. The church I grew up in was the United Church of Christ-- the same denomination, incidentally, that Barak Obama belongs to. We had Nobel prize winning scientists in our congregation. We had ministers who liked to talk about Stephen Hawking. (We've also had openly homosexual worship leaders and ordained ministers.) We had no problems whatsoever with evolution or anything else coming out of science. We think it silly from a historical and text perspective to try to read the Bible as literal truth, never mind from a scientific perspective. And we are all very sad to see extremely loudmouthed jingoistic knee-jerk Biblical literalists out there defining what it is to be "Christian" in a lot of the popular press.

I sometimes fear that some Christians are creationists because they think they have to be in order to remain faithful to their religion. I occasionally have had students come up to me and express basically that after I've given talks about cosmology. I remember one student late last year who really wanted to believe the stuff I was talking about, because it was so cool, but wanted to be able to make it work with what she believed. My answer was that, well, you really can't accept the scientific evidence for this cosmology stuff if you insist on believing that the world was created in seven literal days exactly as described in the first chapter of Genesis. But there are a lot of Christians out there with a very deep and thoughtful faith in both God and Jesus who have no problem with understanding that much of the Bible is composed of stories that say something about being human, and are not necessarily factual history. I continue to write science and religion things, despite the fact that when I do so (such as I did on scienceblogs.com when my blog was there for a time) atheists line up to jump on me for being soft-headed or contributing to the acceptance of the extremists. Part of the reason I do this is in hopes that I might reach out to one or two Christians out there who do not want to abandon their faith, and who may not have realized that they can accept modern science without doing so.

4 responses so far

  • Brandon says:

    Incidentally, PZ Myers now claims that he doesn't want to eliminate religion, just its pervasive influence on policy and science.

    I want it to be like bowling. It's a hobby, something some people will enjoy, that has some virtues to it, that will have its own institutions and its traditions and its own television programming, and that families will enjoy together. It's not something I want to ban or that should affect hiring and firing decisions, or that interferes with public policy. It will be perfectly harmless as long as we don't elect our politicians on the basis of their bowling score, or go to war with people who play nine-pin instead of ten-pin, or use folklore about backspin to make decrees about how biology works.

    So either he's a steaming pile of hypocrisy or he's actually tempering himself.

    Also, have you read this? It's the most eloquent piece I've read on this issue, which is especially ironic because it comes from a trashy humor site.
    http://www.cracked.com/article_15759_10-things-christians-atheists-can-must-agree-on.html

    And just out of curiosity, are you an Obama or a Clinton fan?

  • rknop says:

    It'd be nice if PZ were tempering. Alas, I wrote him off as somebody to listen to long ago.

    Re: my choice, I'm really, really hoping that Obama wins the Demo. primary and the election. I will post a bit more on that, although it may just be a MLP to something Mollishka posted.

  • SLC says:

    Actually, Larry Moran is more extreme then PZ Myers. Moran has questioned whether philosophical theists such as Ken Miller are real scientists.

  • Lewis Perdue says:

    I think many Christians trend toward Creationism because Richard Dawkins and other evangelical atheists piss them off.